The Willamette Valley’s ‘Magic’ Real Estate Number

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Grasping Willamette Valley Real Estate Information Can Seem Like Drinking From A Fire Hydrant

TMREI: Too Much Real Estate Information
Sometimes absorbing the sea of Willamette Valley real estate information is more like drinking from a fire hydrant. Yet, out of all the seemingly helpful real estate data bandied about, there is one especially helpful number, which when understood, can provide near-magical clarity to both homebuyers and homesellers.

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You Needn’t Be a Magician to Understand Housing Inventory

What Is It?
What is this ‘magic’ number and what does it represent? Simply put, it’s the current figure for housing inventory, typically expressed in months of projected home supply.

Listen to the audio podcast presentation of this helpful program on Willamette Valley real estate by clicking here or on the above link.

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Understanding Real Estate Inventory is Not Like Playing Bingo

Housing inventory is also sometimes known as home inventory or housing backlog. Why is this number so important? Once you understand the single figure that defines our current supply of local available Willamette Valley homes for sale, you have an instant ‘snapshot’ on whether you’re in a buyer’s market, seller’s market, or more of a balanced real estate market. Armed with that information, you’re far more ready to do battle in the real estate trenches and more likely to avoid some usual minefields. 

Normal Home Supply
Among real estate experts, a ‘normal’ range for home supply in parts of the Willamette Valley is frequently cited as somewhere between three to six months. For example, if the home supply figure is three, then hypothetically our market would be ‘out of homes’ in three months, provided no new homes were placed for sale. In other words, if our regional home inventory figure is within three to six months, we’re typically experiencing a normal market, meaning one not far from a balance of supply and demand, also called equilibrium. In a way, it’s kind of like an absorption rate for how fast supply is used up.

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Your Mileage May Vary
It’s helpful to understand that home inventory figures are more of an average for a region. In Oregon, major real estate regions include Portland, Bend, Eugene, Salem and the Oregon Coast. So if your property is located in Beaverton, you’re likely to use the Portland area figure as the bellwether for housing backlog. If your home is located in Keizer, you’re likely to see the Salem inventory figure as the closest approximation of local home supply. It’s also likely that your specific area could be somewhat different altogether, based on a variety of hyper-local factors affecting both demand and supply. That said, home inventory is a convenient ‘thumbnail’ sketch to help assess what kind of market you’re in.

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Real Estate Inventory Resembles a Pipeline

What’s The Practical Impact of Housing Inventory?
Consider real estate and inventory like a pipeline. If more flows through it, the product is plentiful and therefore the cheaper it is to buy. So with a lower, dwindling home supply and the spigot turned down, the reverse is true. That’s when the local real estate environment favors sellers, because there are more buyers and it’s considered a ‘seller’s market.’ In that case, expect a short market time and an environment where homesellers receive multiple offers, often at or above listing price. If the supply of homes is higher, it’s considered a ‘buyer’s market.’ This means you can expect a longer market time, with homesellers seeing few, if any offers…and frequently for less than the asking price.  

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Negotiation is Expected, But Most Homesellers Don’t Want to ‘Armwrestle’ With Homebuyers

It’s routinely a good idea for buyers to get a ‘heads up’ before making an offer to determine how ‘hot’ or ‘cold’ the market is. Otherwise, if you ‘lowball’ a just-listed home in a seller’s market, you may be lucky to even get a counteroffer instead of an outright rejection by sellers experiencing lots of calls and showings on their property. Coming in with an offer that’s too low sometimes causes offended sellers to refuse to seriously consider a possible follow up offer.

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The Number of Competing Homes for Sale Affects Market Time

What’s the Big Deal About Housing Inventory?
One reason housing inventory is so important is because it helps buyers and sellers to better manage expectations. Most buyers are interested in how long it may take to find the ‘right’ house. Inventory affects this. Alternatively, most sellers are interested in how long it may take to find a qualified buyer. Inventory affects this, too.

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Willamette Valley Homesellers Can ‘Jumpstart’ Activity with Property Pricing

That’s because a high home inventory tends to slow down the market time and low inventory frequently provides a ‘jump start’ to activity. One way sellers can help to avoid an excessively long market time is to review comparable local home sales information provided by their Realtor to ensure proper, market pricing.

Another reason housing inventory is crucial is because it can significantly impact so many other important factors. In other words, inventory is a ‘driver’ for market time, selling price, appraisal results, lendability and more.

Okay, So Inventory Is Important. What Does It Look Like?

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Portland Metro Sample Home Inventory

The above image provides a good example of fluctuating home inventory. As the Willamette Valley’s real estate market bounced back from the severe market downturn of the Great Recession, the home inventory for some areas reduced from more than 20 months of housing supply to less than three.

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It’s Wise to Consult An Experienced Realtor Before You Leap Into the Market

Contact the Experts
Thinking about selling your Willamette Valley property? Know the market before diving in! Contact veteran Oregon Realtor Roy Widing with your questions and for a free consultation on what your property could sell for today using the contact form below.

Posted in Willamette Valley, Willamette Valley Economy, Willamette Valley Home, Willamette Valley Home Buying, Willamette Valley Homebuyer, Willamette Valley Homes, Willamette Valley Homeselling, Willamette Valley Housing, Willamette Valley Oregon, WIllamette Valley Podcast, Willamette Valley Properties, Willamette Valley Property, Willamette Valley Real Estate | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Why Willamette Valley Homesellers Hire A Realtor

There are many good reasons why Willamette Valley homesellers hire a Realtor, including the handful who first try the ‘for sale by owner’ or ‘FSBO’ route. Here are ten of the most common reasons why Willamette Valley homesellers hire a Realtor to get the job done right. 

Hear the audio podcast version of this presentation by clicking here or the link above.

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Selling Your Own Home? Prepare Yourself for Wearing Many Hats.

1. Selling Your Home ‘By Owner’ Means Taking on a Second Job.
Most homesellers are busy. So before attempting to sell property on your own, first ask yourself if you’re prepared to wear some extra hats. That’s because in addition to (1). preparing your property for market and (2). finding a replacement dwelling, along with (3). the task of actually moving, selling your home involves (4). abundant planning, (5). serious paperwork, (6). negotiation skills, (7). accurate scheduling, (8). diligent research, (9). considerable legwork (if done right) and (10). a lot of just plain toil. Willamette Valley, Willamette Valley Real Estate, Willamette Valley Homes

2. Legalese, Sometimes with Different Rules for Each County and/or Municipality.
Realtors use continually-updated forms written by experienced real estate attorneys designed specifically for regional transactions, with clarity and simplicity in mind. Such documents include important protections for both buyer and seller. While no document is perfect, Realtor forms include key clauses, like for home inspections and appraisals, along with arbitration/mediation mechanisms. These time-tested documents help prevent potential issues, while at the same time deterring ‘nuisance’ litigation.

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3. More Accurate Pricing When Buying & Selling.
These days the average Willamette Valley resident moves about every 6 years years or so. As with any activity, it’s easy to get rusty. Realtors are in the real estate market all day, every day. This means an experienced real estate agent can provide significant market awareness to help you price what’s likely to be your single largest investment.

Armed with access to multiple listing, sales and tax data, Realtors provide significant pricing experience and real life insights, whether you want to know what the property you’re selling is worth, or once you sell, how much to offer on the home you’re buying.

Willamette Valley, Willamette Valley Real Estate, Willamette Valley Homes4. Objectivity.
We all deal with subjectivity from time to time. Does your home smell? Perhaps you’ve gotten used to having multiple pets in your small home, don’t notice the mold growing in your bathroom, or haven’t realized how gloomy your living room appears. One role of a Realtor is to be helpfully honest. That means being truthful if there’s something you as a seller don’t see (or smell). 

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Most Homesellers Don’t Like A Rapidly Exiting ‘Conga Line’ of Mum Buyers

Far better to be forewarned and forearmed by your Realtor, than witness a rapidly exiting conga line of mum homebuyers who don’t want to offend you. Or perhaps you don’t think disclosing settling water in your basement each Winter is a big deal. The reality is that disclosing such a potentially material fact is something dutiful agents will advise in order to keep you out of much hotter water after the sale. 

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5. Junk the Junk.
Have you ever studied a real estate earnest money agreement (also called an EMA or purchase agreement), or seller’s ‘net sheet?’ Over the course of a transaction, it’s easy to accumulate an abundance of ‘junk’ fees. Sometimes seller-paid closing costs are necessary to make a transaction work. However, paying for a buyer’s home warranty is typically more of a buyer ‘want’ than a ‘need.’ Count on your Realtor to go over such factors with you for a ‘heads up’ of what to expect. An experienced agent knows what’s usually ‘routine’ and what’s not.

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6. Marketing.
Even if a seller has a sense of what his or her home is worth, effectively reaching the the widest number of buyers increases your opportunity to find more motivated and qualified buyers, even creating a ‘bidding war.’ The simple act of listing your home with a Realtor means your property is immediately promoted on a host of proven, effective home marketing venues. But it doesn’t stop there. Successful Realtors use many different tools to reach buyers for your specific property.

Connecting your property with the right buyer can mean the difference between a fast close at full price (or higher), compared to a continuous stream of ‘sale-fails’ where your property is needlessly taken off the market by buyers who were marginally qualified. 

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Calm Seas Never Made a Good Captain…or Realtor.

7. Experience.
There is simply no substitute for ‘hands on’ real estate experience. If your home hasn’t sold, at what point should you consider a price adjustment? How much of a price adjustment is necessary? Is there something other than price causing my property not to sell? These are not new questions to an experienced agent, who can help address these and other important questions.

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When it Matters, Experience is Good to Have on Your Side.

It’s comforting in especially difficult situations to rely on an experienced Realtor, who is the duly able real estate ‘captain’ of your transaction. Most people prefer an experienced surgeon or pilot, so it’s understandable to want experienced representation with the important task of selling your home. It’s also helpful to know that a professional real estate agent makes the entire home selling process appear easier than it is.

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Most people are nervous and ‘en garde’ when buying or selling a home.

8. Negotiation Skills.
If you’re like most people, you dread negotiating when buying a car. Consider how much higher the stakes are with your home sale. You want an experienced hand on your side. 
While real estate transactions are optimally a ‘win-win’ situation, it’s realistic to expect some friction. If you haven’t considered homeselling as a kind of ‘war,’ check out this unique perspective on the ‘battle’ of selling your home. 

The best way to navigate through a potentially difficult transaction is to be represented by someone who has been over the road before. So whether you’re in negotiations with a ‘bargain hunting’ buyer, experience an unpleasant ‘surprise’ in a home inspection, or a seriously low appraisal, each unique situation presents an opportunity for difficulty and reaching common ground. Your Realtor can assist in ‘end gaming’ your best strategies and in dealing with a wide variety of buyer personalities.

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Having a Realtor ‘Buffer’ Between Buyer & Seller Can Avoid Headaches

9. The ‘Buffer Effect.’
Having an agent represent you makes it easier to maintain civility between ‘warring’ parties.  If you don’t consider homeselling as a battle, then see our prior article and podcast titled ‘The Art of War for Homesellers.’ Ever say something you regret? An experienced Realtor can often use more constructive language to accomplish what can sometimes be an emotional and/or provocative comment.

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Hiring A Realtor Makes Sellers More Money: Click above image to enlarge

10. More Money.
National Association of Realtor statistics reveal that homesellers who use a Realtor actually net considerably more at closing than those who don’t, even after taking into account paying a commission. Consider that when banks (which are renowned for watching the ‘bottom line’) sell their foreclosed homes, they hire an expert, a Realtor. From a financial standpoint, it really does ‘pencil out’ to hire a Realtor. 

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Oregon Realtor Roy Widing

Thinking about selling your Willamette Valley property? Contact Roy with Certified Realty, Oregon’s choice since 1950 using the form below for a free consultation.


Posted in Willamette Valley, Willamette Valley Economy, Willamette Valley Home, Willamette Valley Home Buying, Willamette Valley Homebuyer, Willamette Valley Homes, Willamette Valley Homeselling, Willamette Valley Housing, Willamette Valley Oregon, WIllamette Valley Podcast, Willamette Valley Properties, Willamette Valley Real Estate | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Why Does My Realtor Do That?

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Realtors must follow many rules and according to consumer satisfaction surveys, real estate agents generally do a good job. Realtors are trained to abide by applicable state and national real estate laws, follow accepted business practices and the Realtor Code of Ethics, which is considered a higher standard of duty. Yet as in other professions, sometimes agents fall short. Wrong is wrong, yet it’s also important to separate willful wrongdoing from expectations which may be misinterpreted, or where motives are misunderstood.   

Hear the audio podcast version of this article here or click the ‘play’ button below:

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Failure or Flying Colors? 
When real estate agents are perceived to have ‘dropped the ball,’ a good first step is to see if there’s an explanation behind it. Let’s take one common example, the case of the ‘disappearing Realtor.’ Unless you’re in the midst of a transaction, if your real estate agent has fallen out of touch,  it’s entirely possible that he or she is no longer in the business, moved, is ill, or perhaps decided to focus on another field within real estate, (such as commercial, or property management). Another likelihood is a transition to working with other client types or geographical areas.

One reason for a ‘disappearing agent’ may also be because your lender informed the agent that you are not qualified to purchase a home. While ceasing to contact you because you’re not in the market to buy right now isn’t illegal, it could be considered rude. Being human, sometimes agents are unartful. But as when dealing with any professional, it’s instructive to distinguish between the unartful and activity which is unethical, or illegal.

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While most Realtors are diligent, honest and hardworking, there can be a broad range of Realtor behavior, ranging from ‘normal’ and reasonable, to impolite, to unethical, or even criminal. So let’s analyze some comments about Realtors. Sometimes the agent is ‘out of line,’ yet sometimes it helps to better understand differing perspectives to get the whole picture.  Here are some examples of Realtor behaviors you may have heard about.

Willamette Valley, Real Estate, Homes1. ‘Why Don’t Realtors Return Calls (or e-Mails, or Texts)?’
Unless it’s an isolated incident or emergency, this kind of Realtor behavior can be inexcusable, especially in an industry where communication is key. It’s true that some agents have a difficult time responding in a timely manner. A common reason is that some agents are simply disorganized. Simply put, if it’s chronic, this is bad form, bad business and outright rude. Such non-responsiveness even drives other Realtors nuts, particularly if they wish to show a home that is listed, present an offer, or simply find out if a home is still for sale.

Other explanations for not returning phone calls may be a personal habit among such agents, a sign that he or she is seriously overly busy (still no excuse), or perhaps is trying to tell you in a passive-aggressive manner that your business relationship is on the wane. Realtors sometimes have been known to ‘fire’ a client. What to do? Be clear with your agent about what you expect. Given a myriad of possible communication forms these days, if you have a preference for being reached by text, phone, e-mails, Facetime or Skype, explain that to your Realtor early on. Not everyone has the same communication style or tools.

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2. ‘A Realtor Insisted I Get ‘Pre-Qualified’ Before Showing Me Homes.’
This is an easy one. First, let’s imagine you’re a seller. Early on as your home is placed for sale, you notice many ‘tire-kickers’ and ‘looky-Lou’s’ traipsing through your house, including a large number of neighbors, with little apparent intention to buy, along with unqualified buyers, who are likely unable to buy. Yet, each time you receive a request to tour your home, you spend half an hour or more getting it cleaned up and leaving for showings. The result? Sellers want buyers to be pre-qualified.

Now, let’s imagine you’re a Realtor. You’ve just spent the past two weeks showing homes to buyers. Then you learn the ‘buyers’ can’t buy because the lender said their credit, income or other disqualifying factor disallowed it. The result? Realtors want buyers to be pre-qualified.

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3. ‘My Realtor Says My Home is Overpriced.’
It’s entirely possible that your home could be overpriced, yet there are several issues you may first want to sort out.  For example, when you placed your home for sale, what was the process you and your Realtor used to arrive at a list price? How long has your home been on the market? Has your property been receiving showings? Did you discuss what kind of market response might suggest the need for a price adjustment? What is the average market time for similar homes in your neighborhood?

Also, were you provided with comparable property information? Have you seen any documentation that confirms buyer activity, like online ‘hit counts?’ In other words, there may be valid reasons for your agent to suggest a price adjustment. Also usually helpful is going back to the ‘comps’ or comparable properties used to price your home, while researching to see if any other similar properties may have sold in the meanwhile since your property was placed on the market. For some helpful insights, answers and information about these questions, check out our article and related podcast ‘3 Steps To An Oregon Home Sale” here.

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4. ‘A Realtor Bought My Property And I Feel Cheated.’
State real estate regulators cite the majority of claims against agents is due to ‘self-dealing,’ where an agent acts on his or her behalf. For example, a Realtor may be asked to list a property, but instead after speaking with the owner, buys it for him or herself. There are strict rules for Realtors to follow when buying or selling real estate in Oregon. Given disclosure laws, real estate agents are on notice that they are being watched closely by various regulatory bodies, particularly if an agent is ‘self dealing.’ If you ever feel cheated by a real estate agent, you can contact the Oregon Real Estate Agency, or your local association of Realtors.

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Crime Victim Realtor Ashley Okland

5. ‘A Realtor Refused to Meet Me At A Home!’
Personal safety has become an important Realtor issue, especially since Realtors often work with the public alone, at night and in unfamiliar surroundings.  As a consequence, agents are advised not to meet prospective first time clients alone in a remote location or vacant home. Realtors Ashley Okland and Beverly Carter were real estate agents who did and their tragic stories are mentioned in educating real estate agents about personal safety.  

Willamette Valley, Real Estate, HomesGiven incidents like this devastating story of a Realtor’s murder that generated significant media attention, expect Realtors who’ve never met you to be cautious.Willamette Valley, Real Estate, HomesWith concern for personal safety up, self defense classes are more popular and concealed handgun carry is growing across the nation…and that includes Realtors, too.

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6. ‘Why Won’t My Realtor Hold An Open House?’
Simply put, selling homes can be a numbers game and here they are:

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How Homes Are Sold

Fact is, open houses most often benefit Realtors, not homesellers. That’s because most buyers don’t purchase through an open house. However, open houses are one way real estate agents can find new buyers. This isn’t to say that open houses will never sell a home. But given a variety of factors, it’s considered among the least effective ways to sell a home. 

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Thinking about buying or selling an Oregon home? Contact veteran Oregon Realtor Roy Widing with Certified Realty using the convenient contact form below for a free consultation.

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The Willamette Valley ‘Two Transaction Tango’

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Simultaneous/Consecutive Home Transactions
Selling your Willamette Valley home and buying a replacement property are frequently linked activities. In this article and podcast, we reveal how to maximize the efficiency and minimize the bother when simultaneously home buying and home selling.

Click here or on the ‘play’ button below for the audio version of this presentation about homebuying while homeselling.


We’ll also examine options to help decide if either simultaneous or consecutive real estate transactions may be best for you.

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Timing
The singular act of buying or selling a home is often the foremost concern of many. Whichever immediate task you may be considering, it’s common to have twice the activity anticipated, but in two steps. That’s because Willamette Valley home buyers often have a home to sell…and Willamette Valley home sellers are frequently seeking a home to buy. So what’s the best way to navigate this potential real estate quagmire without getting entangled in a morass of stress and needless extra costs?

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First Steps
To begin, it helps to examine three common dual home sale/home purchase options:

  1. Selling your existing house first, then buying your next house.
  2. Buying the next house first, then selling your existing house.
  3. Simultaneously moving from your existing house to your next house.

Your challenges, benefits and results will largely depend upon which of these three decisions you settle upon. Here are three quick takeaways for these three usual options:

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Option #1.  Selling your existing house first, then buying the next house
This option usually requires a ‘double move.’ Yet one advantage of this approach is that you won’t have double house payments. One disadvantage is that you may have to move twice.  An added benefit of this ‘selling first’ approach can include negotiating with strength in the purchase of your next home. That’s because your purchase needn’t be contingent upon the sale or closing of your sold home. As a result, you are seen as a ‘cash in fist’ buyer, or at the very least, a buyer who is considerably more likely to qualify for a home purchase, given that you ostensibly now have access to the equity in your now-sold home. This helps you negotiate with more power in the purchase of your next home.

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Option #2.   Buying the next house first, then selling your existing house
When first buying a house, then selling yours, one advantage is that you know where you’ll be moving. The reduced stress of ‘knowing where you’ll land’ is empowering.

Unless you’re a cash buyer, you’ll likely need to qualify with a lender. And if you have an existing loan in place on the house you’ll be selling, this may mean you need to qualify for two loans, your current home loan and the loan on the house you’re buying.

As long as your current Willamette Valley home sells in a timely manner, added financial obligations can be minimized.  For more information about bridge loans, see the below ‘A Bridge Too Far?’ discussion.

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Option #3.  Simultaneously moving from your existing house to your next house
This situation is very common. Provided your activities are clearly thought out, well-executed and contingencies are in place for protection, it’s also one of the more affordable options.

Think far ahead and shoot for impeccable timing, in order to make your move the smoothest possible. In order to have sufficient time to move out soon after closing on your current home’s transaction, you will need to locate your next home, write an accepted offer, have the home inspection and if you’re getting a home loan, likely an appraisal…all before you close on the purchase and can actually move in.

One advantage of this approach is that you won’t have double house payments. You also know where you will be landing, and you won’t likely have to move twice. One disadvantage is that your timing needs to be good and possibly have a little extra ‘cushion’ to allow for emergencies, like delays with appraisals, inspections and repairs. Otherwise it’s easy to feel ‘squeezed’ by your being in the middle of two time-sensitive transactions.

That’s one challenge of going this route; It’s complicated by not knowing with precision the timeline of certain key activities. That’s because while home inspections can usually be completed within a set time frame, like 10-14 business days, other requirements like appraisals, can take much longer, with less certainty of the completion date. On top of that, most transactions involve two appraisals, one on the house you’re selling and another on the house you’re buying. So if you plan on a simultaneous sale/purchase, huddle up with your Realtor to create a well planned timeline, then build in some extra breathing room, as necessary.

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A Bridge Too Far?
One way to do purchase a house without first selling your Willamette Valley home is with what’s called a ‘bridge loan.’ This is effectively a loan against the equity on your existing home. There are plenty of added details, but for the sake of simplicity, just understand that if you use a bridge loan to buy your next home, until your current home is sold, you will likely have double house payments. So if your current home doesn’t sell in a timely manner, hopefully the squeeze on your wallet won’t be more stressful than if you were to have simply sold your existing home first. 

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Tools of the Trade
To accomplish the job of simultaneously buying and selling homes, among the most common protective tools is called a contingency. Consider contingencies as akin to safety goggles. They’re designed to prevent a mishap, only in this case, the mishap could be losing your earnest money.

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Earnest Money
Earnest money is usually a certain dollar figure placed on deposit as a sign a buyer is earnest, and later applied to the home purchase. This helps convince sellers that a buyer is serious and take their property off the market. Earnest money essentially helps to ‘hold’ a property for a buyer. Earnest money is not often the total down payment, although it can be applied as part of the down payment.  Earnest money is important to homesellers, because without it, a buyer could otherwise tie up the seller’s property with virtually no obligation.

A large part of contingencies relate to a buyer keeping their earnest money, or the initial deposit showing the buyer is ‘earnest’ in proceeding to closing on a home sale. If a homebuyer does not have a sufficient contingency in place during a home sale, forfeiture of a buyer’s earnest money becomes possible. It’s not terribly common, but it can and does sometimes happen.

Types of Contingencies
Home inspection contingencies provide buyers with the right to have a house inspected for a variety of conditions, all within a specified time frame. Another common contingency is the loan contingency, so if for some reason a lender does not approve a buyer or the property for a home loan, the earnest money deposit is returned to the buyer. Buyers have lost out on qualifying for a home loan because they went out and bought a car during the home purchasing process, thereby disrupting their loan ratios.

The Reality of Earnest Money Deposit Risk
As long as appropriate contingencies are in place and they’re followed in a time-conscious manner, it’s relatively uncommon for buyers to lose their earnest money. It’s always a good idea to keep an eye on your timeline.

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Buying And/Or Selling?
Use the form below to contact Willamette Valley real estate expert Realtor Roy Widing with Certified Realty for a FREE consultation. Whether your real estate situation involves homebuying, homeselling, or if you simply have questions about our current Willamette Valley real estate market, Roy can help!

Posted in Willamete Valley Properties, Willamette Valley, Willamette Valley Home, Willamette Valley Home Buying, Willamette Valley Homebuyer, Willamette Valley Homes, Willamette Valley Homeselling, Willamette Valley Housing, Willamette Valley Oregon, Willamette Valley Properties, Willamette Valley Property, Willamette Valley Real Estate | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

10 Reasons Willamette Valley Winter Homeselling Is Hot

Willamette Valley, Winter HomesellingWhile there is a case to be made for homeselling in each of the four seasons, Winter is one of the most powerful times Willamette Valley sellers can place their home on the market and for ten very good reasons.

Click here or the play button below for the audio podcast presentation of this article.

  1. Price & Market Time. Statistics show homes sell faster and for more money in Winter. One way to understand this phenomenon is by considering a motorist with a flat tire in bad weather. That motorist has an urgent need and is less likely to haggle, or even seriously consider less expensive options, in order to meet an immediate need. Winter homebuyers can experience the same kind of urgency and this helps to explain the premium that homes can command during the real estate ‘off season.’ Another way to look at the Winter market dynamic is if you want to buy snowshoes in July (at least in Oregon), expect to pay more, since availability is typically lower. Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
  2. High Quality Buyers. Because home touring is generally less convenient, there tend to be fewer ‘Looky-Loos’ during the Winter. This means Oregon Winter homesellers have fewer buyers tracking dirt into their house, with less energy spent preparing for real estate ‘Tire-Kickers.’Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
  3. Less Seller Competition. Let’s face facts: It’s convenient to sell in the Spring and Summer, especially in Oregon. The weather is usually better, flowers are blooming and with plenty of homebuyers looking, it’s a ‘target-rich environment.’  Yet while it’s easier and more convenient to sell in sunny weather, this convenience often comes at the cost of increased competition from other sellers. Conversely, Winter homesellers can expect fewer like-minded sellers competing for buyers. Just like the successful contrarian investor who sells when everyone else is not, avoiding a ‘herd mentality’ can pay off with a higher price and faster sale. Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
  4. Higher Buyer Motivation. Is your idea of a fun time getting into a car on cold drizzly nights to look at houses? Probably not…unless you just got a job transfer. Or a nice raise. Or you received an inheritance and want to get out of your tiny apartment. It’s helpful for prospective Winter homesellers to know that corporate relocations are common in the first quarter.  Plus family changes can occur anytime and estates are settled year around.
    Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
  5. The Hunt for Red December: Get a ‘Jump’ on the New Year’ s Competition. The best time to get your property on the market could be when everyone else isn’t. Placing your home for sale in Winter gives you access to hyper-motivated buyers who have made homebuying a New Year’s resolution. That way, when these eager homebuyers begin their ‘hunt,’ your house will be a prime ‘target’ as visible as Rudolph’s nose. So if your home is market-ready and available to tour leading up to the New Year, expect to tap into this highly focused ‘pent up demand.’
    Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
  6. Your Home Looks Inviting During the Holidays. Who doesn’t enjoy the happy glow of a Christmas tree or other holiday decorations, along with the pleasant smell of fresh-baked pumpkin pie, cinnamon buns, or a vanilla candle? Homes often look their most inviting during the holidays.
    Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
    And given the pleasant, even emotional attachment so many have during that time of year, expect some homebuyers to fully embrace the holiday theme of ‘Peace on earth, good will toward men.’ As a result, such positive feelings can spill over into the home selling process and make it easier.
    Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
  7. Your Lawn & Landscaping is Virtually a Non-Issue. Forget to mow your lawn? No worries. Some buyers won’t care if they tour your property and it’s covered in snow, raining hard, or after sundown. Buyer landscaping expectations can be quite reasonable during Winter months in Oregon.Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
  8. When Your Home Sells, You May Buy With Less Competition. Few homesellers stop to consider that given good timing with their sale, their own future home purchase may also benefit from similar, unique seasonality. So depending on a variety of factors in the market where and when you buy, homesellers can sometimes take advantage of lower Winter activity levels to successfully negotiate with a motivated seller. This is because some sellers place their home on the market during Winter not for convenience, or desire to maximize their selling price, but from genuine need. In other words, they are highly motivated. Such homesellers could therefore provide a good buying opportunity.
    Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
  9.  Fewer people relocate in Winter, so this means you’re likely to have an easier time booking a mover.
    Competition for moving companies can be challenging during the real estate ‘high season.’ As a result, expect less difficulty scheduling your moving company when you sell in Winter.
    Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling
  10.  You Can Dictate Which Days & Times Are Available for Showings. As a homeseller, you typically have control over tour times and dates for your home. This includes during Winter months. Given holiday-related gatherings and events, buyers are likely to understand their need to schedule their tour of your home. Your Realtor can help by specifying days and times your home is available for showings. For example, you could have your house available for tours on Saturdays from 2 to 5pm, weekday mornings after 9:00am, or between 5 and 8pm weekday evenings.

Willamette Valley, Winter Homeselling

Thinking about selling your Oregon house this Winter? Use the convenient form below to contact our sponsor, Certified Realty for a FREE consultation!

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Posted in Holiday Homeselling, Oregon Homeseller, Oregon Homeselling, Oregon Homeselllers, Oregon News, Oregon Real Estate, Oregon Real Estate News, Oregon Realty, Willamete Valley Properties, Willamette Valley, Willamette Valley Home, Willamette Valley Homes, Willamette Valley Housing, Willamette Valley Oregon, Willamette Valley Properties, Willamette Valley Property, Willamette Valley Real Estate, Winter Homeseller | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

5 Winning Homebuyer Strategies for Any Market

Regardless of the kind of market you find yourself in when buying your next home, there are key tactics buyers can use to make the process both more successful and considerably less stressful. What are these key homebuying tactics and how can you use them to navigate your next home purchase to a successful close? Find out in this Podcast to help Willamette Valley Homebuyers.

Listen to the audio podcast version of this article by clicking here or the ‘play’ button:

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‘The Thinker’ by Rodin

How Homesellers Think
There are plenty of factors that can influence how sellers think.  Among the most important of these is motivation, or a seller’s reason and/or need to sell. For example, expect different seller responses depending on if a homeseller is in no hurry, compared to other sellers needing a fast sale in order to purchase their ‘dream home’ or move for a job transfer. That’s frequently among the most frustrating elements for homebuyers, the variability not just in homes and seller pricing strategies, but navigating homeseller personalities and motivations.  

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Given the significant tasks involved with selling a property, some homebuyers may understandably wonder: Aren’t all sellers motivated?  Sometimes the answer is both ‘yes’ AND  ‘no.’  Consider a divorce situation, where one spouse desperately needs money and the other does not wish to move at all. Or consider an estate, where there are multiple family members, each with varying degrees of interest in selling; One family member may greatly need proceeds from a home sale, while the others are independently wealthy and perfectly willing to wait to sell, perhaps for tax purposes.

This means it’s helpful to first realize that as when fishing, you’ll never really know what you’ll be dealing with until you have them ‘on the line.’ Looks can be deceiving and no matter how a homeseller may outwardly behave, their motivation for selling is sometimes hidden and an important factor to determine as early as possible.  The situation can be further complicated if sellers have a large mortgage on their property being sold. In such a case, they’re not really negotiating with ‘extra’ money. They simply have little price flexibility in order to pay off their home loan and pay closing costs.  

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For Example
For an example of how disparately homesellers can behave, let’s say you drive up to a house your Realtor found for you. Walking up the steps to the porch, you begin your home tour. Upon entering, you immediately see the home is immaculate, the view grand, the layout ideal. It’s a great house. Yet compared to other homes you’ve seen, the price still seems a little high. In fact, you’re pre-approved, but purchasing the home at the seller’s asking price would be a tight squeeze.

Because it’s a great house and you’re ready to buy, you meet with your Realtor that night and write a ‘clean,’ yet not quite full price offer. Your Realtor forwards the offer to the seller’s Realtor and makes sure to include your lender’s pre-approval letter. The next day, your Realtor calls you with an update.

“Your offer was not accepted. But the sellers sent you a counteroffer at full price.” 

“Full price! Why?” you ask.

“Well, they just placed the property on the market, are not in hurry and figured they could do better than your initial offer.”

Welcome inside the world of seller motivation.

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Knowledge is Power
Given situations like this, it helps to know as much as you can about the local real estate market, the property, the sellers and details about their situation. For example, sellers frequently exhibit less price flexibility early on in the listing period. That’s because if the property is new to the market, their opinion is often strongly in favor of their home’s benefits and sometimes they don’t even know where they will move yet. It’s also common for sellers to think ‘I can always come down in price if it doesn’t sell.’

Fast forwarding a month or two into a property’s market time, the situation and seller’s attitude can look considerably different.  By then, buyers have ostensibly toured and rejected the property as being ‘too high’ by a handful (or more) of qualified buyers. ‘Why doesn’t someone just bring us an offer,’ some sellers might then ask. The saying ‘Price cures all ills’ is sometimes hard for sellers to hear, but generally true.  Buyers are constantly comparing the home they’re looking at to others they’ve toured. One home may have a more desirable floorplan, another home may have a better view, another may have an extra bedroom, bathroom, or larger garage.

So why don’t some buyers write an offer for less than asking price? Here are just a few reasons: 

  1. Buyers not wanting to offend the seller
  2. Buyers not thinking the seller would respond favorably
  3. Buyers not even aware the property is for sale,  given the high price
  4. Buyers concerned that the property would not appraise high enough
  5. Buyers plan to make changes to the house, which requires additional cost

Inventory
Another independent, yet primary factor to consider when homebuying is inventory, or the amount of competing homes on the market. If the real estate market is flooded with properties, expect different behavior from most homesellers compared to a market where homes are scarce. Let’s briefly consider the concept of equilbrium,  buyer’s market and seller’s market.

Equlibrium
When neither buyers or sellers dominate, a real estate market is considered to be balanced or in equilibrium. In our region, the range of 3 to 6 months of home supply is generally considered to be favoring neither buyers or sellers and otherwise ‘normal.’ Inventory figures are released monthly by multiple listing services.

Buyer’s Market
A buyer’s market exists when there are more sellers than buyers. Usually this means there is an abundance of homes to choose from, so it’s considered a market favorable to buyers. In our region, more than 6 months of home supply is generally considered to be favoring buyers. Home prices are typically falling, market times are longer and sellers are competing for buyers.

Seller’s Market
A seller’s market exists when there are more buyers than sellers. This is indicative when there is low home inventory to choose from, so it’s considered a market favorable to sellers. In our region, fewer than 3 months of home supply is generally considered to be favoring sellers. Home prices are typically rising, market times are shorter and buyers are competing for properties.

Interest Rates
A relatively minor shift in interest rates can price some of the properties a buyer might consider buying ‘out of reach.’ And while interest rates are a factor outside the control of both buyers and sellers, they remain part of the market landscape through which everyone needs to navigate. 

Market environments are important, but unless the element of seller motivation is well understood, you could even be dealing with an unmotivated seller in a buyer’s market and see poor results. That’s because the factors of seller motivation and home inventory, for example are not linked, but variables for homebuyers to consider.

If homes are scarce and prices are rising, understand that buyers are likely to feel pretty good about their property. As a result, presenting a clean and very strong offer is likely to work best in any market, but especially in a competitive situation with other homebuyers. Also include your lender’s pre-approval letter to confirm that you are able to afford the home you’re bidding on.

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In Real Estate, It Helps to Level the Playing Field

If the market is balanced, with neither buyers or sellers holding the ‘upper hand,’ the playing field is more level. But you still must deal with seller motivation. As a homebuyer, it’s to your advantage if the seller has a real, time-sensitive reason for selling.  If you’re buying in a buyer’s market with lots of homes to choose from, realize that while most sellers will adjust to the market with reasonable prices in order to compete, there are still ‘hold-outs’ who remain less motivated.

Dealing with marginally motivated homesellers can be frustrating, but sometimes helped by determining if there are any areas that matter to them.  For example, if your offer gives the seemingly unmotivated seller an extra two weeks to move out at no added cost for ‘rent back,’ he or she may then reconsider a less-than-full-price offer. Figure the ‘pain point’ of a seller and you may be able to craft a ‘win-win’ offer.

Keeping the important consideration of seller motivation in mind, here are five tactics to make your homebuying more effective and less stressful:

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Homebuyer Tactic #1: Do Your Homework
Have your Realtor research the property before you consider making an offer. The answers to certain questions can help reveal insights. How long has it been on the market? Have there been any price changes? How many different listing Realtors has this seller gone through? Observing that more than a couple Realtors worked with the same seller within a relatively short time period can suggest an unreasonable seller who is either unmotivated, not willing to seriously look at the market, or one that is simply ‘difficult.’

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Understand that even if a property is significantly overpriced, early in the process many homesellers remain enthusiastic about any interest in their property. In this situation, each showing early on confirms the seller’s belief that theirs is the best home in town. Experienced Realtors know the process well and by simple observation can become astute in understanding seller behavior. And sometimes the occasional ‘lightning strike’ will occur, where a seemingly above-market price offer is made for more than a property appears to be worth. But generally speaking, this is the exception and not the rule. And by staying with an above-market price over an extended period of time, sellers then run the risk of their property becoming ‘shop worn,’ with buyers wondering ‘What’s wrong with it? Why hasn’t it sold already?’

As a result, most experienced agents understand a seller’s price that turns out to be ‘above the market’ can change with time, or until at least a few qualified buyers walk away without making an offer. Further complicating the situation is if a seller is not particularly motivated, which is sometimes difficult to address. This underscores the importance of homebuyers understanding the homeseller’s motivation. Does the homeseller have a deadline, such as a purchase agreement already in place, a time sensitive job transfer, or an expiring interest rate lock, in order to purchase another property?

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Homebuyer Tactic #2:  Write a Strong Clean Offer, with Minimal Contingencies
Offer close enough to avoid triggering a counteroffer. Sometimes a homeseller will not want to ‘rock the boat’ if an offer is fairly close to their asking, despite not being full price. Once a counteroffer is ‘triggered,’ additional items in the original offer may be changed, since a counteroffer essentially restarts the negotiation process anyway.

This is also where comparable research can be helpful. If you’re convinced that the property is overpriced and you’re unable or unwilling to offer what the seller is asking, consider including a market analysis with your offer and include truly comparable property information that shows why your offer is not for full price. 

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Back it Up
A pre-approval letter made for the exact purchase price can help make your ‘strong, clean offer’ stronger . You may not want to telegraph that you’re qualified for a home loan in excess of your offered amount, which is why lenders frequently will send your Realtor a pre-approval letter that precisely matches your offered price. Otherwise, if you show a seller you’re approved significantly above the offered price, the seller may simply respond with a full price offer, figuring you’ll pay more because you can afford it.

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Homebuyer Tactic #3:  Escalator Clause
If you expect the property you want to buy will have multiple offers, one way to both stand out and enhance your odds of success is by using what’s sometime known as an ‘escalator clause.’  Under this scenario, your offer is made and in it, you agree to beat any other offer up to a certain maximum dollar figure and usually in an increment of say, $1,000 or other specified amount. There can be various elements to an ‘escalator’ clause. If your ‘escalator’ offer is accepted, proof of the second best offer is typically provided to confirm the appropriate purchase price above which the winning buyer then must pay.

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Homebuyer Tactic #4: Activate ‘Stealth Mode’
If you’re a ‘choosey’ homebuyer, or seeking to buy in a certain area or neighborhood with few homes for sale you’re interested in, consider having your Realtor go into ‘stealth mode.’ This could mean having your agent knock on doors, collaborate with other Realtors having a ‘pocket’ or unofficial listing, or simply become hyper observant.  Many buyers don’t even consider this approach, which while unconventional, can sometimes pay off with work, persistence and a little luck.

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The Pre-Listing Stage
In the early phases before a property is formally placed on the market, there are various pre-listing indications you might notice. For example, a location company is often contacted to spray paint where utility lines are located. This prevents a real estate sign placement company from digging a hole and hitting a gas or electric line. How does this matter? If you or your Realtor observe such ‘utility locator’ paint, or a dumpster, a storage ‘pod,’ a moving truck, a U-Haul van, or a ‘hanging signpost’ without a real estate sign yet placed, these hints can sometimes indicate a property is being put up for sale…giving you a headstart before other buyers find out about the home. If the average market time for a given area is weeks or months and you have a ‘heads up’ even before day one of the property hitting the market, you have a tactical advantage.

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Stealth Research Can Provide a ‘Direct Hit’ of Otherwise Little-Seen Information

For currently listed properties, other examples of ‘Stealth Mode’ could include your agent researching information on a property or homeseller for potentially helpful tidbits. This might be helpful legal information such as an estate, lawsuit, divorce or inheritance. Other possibly helpful records to consider may involve tax records, old listings from the local multiple listing system (or a separate more distant MLS altogether), since sometimes property history will not always be found in the usual multiple listing system.  

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Homebuyer Tactic #5: Prepare for a 2nd Bite of the Apple
Once your offer is accepted, that’s it, right? Not necessarily. A well-prepared homebuyer always keeps an extra tactic or two ‘tucked away.’

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So as ‘back up’ tactics go, one might consider such ‘deep concealment’ techniques much like an ankle holster: Maybe not your first line of defense, but nice to have, ‘just in case.’  What is an example of such a ‘back up’ homebuyer technique and why might it be considered so stealthy? 

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Being ‘En Garde’ Helps to Prevent Needless Surprises

‘En Garde’
First, it’s important to understand that like homebuyers, homesellers are typically most ‘on guard’ during formal negotiations. This period usually begins once an offer is written, plus during any ‘back and forth’ by buyers and sellers. Once an agreement is reached, even though there remains significant time, work, patience and even negotiation until the sale is officially closed, most buyers and sellers relax a bit psychologically.  But therein lies the problem, since realistically, two key factors usually remain that could interrupt, or even destroy the existing sale now in place. 

These two key factors include the inspection and appraisal, both which the seller has little control over. So if the home inspection reveals there are now plenty of heretofore unknown repairs, there are several possible scenarios on the inspection alone:

  1. Seller pays for everything
  2. Buyer pays for everything
  3. Buyer and seller negotiate

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Assuming any home inspection items are successfully ironed out, this still leaves the appraisal. What could go wrong there? Two of the more common appraisal ‘minefields’ are (a) value and (b) additional repair and/or code factors. If a barn does not have a permit, the home inspector missed an issue important to the appraisal, or the appraisal comes in low, expect more potential negotiation between buyer and seller to close the transaction.

Most buyers don’t necessarily focus on getting a ‘second bite at the apple.’ But if you feel your initial negotiation in purchasing a property didn’t go perfectly, sometimes the inspection and/or appraisal provides a renewed source of redress. And if the property has material defects, the seller is required to either disclose or fix them, in the event your transaction doesn’t go through. And regarding the appraisal, there is no guarantee a different appraisal will come in much different. So if the appraisal is low, renewed negotiation can occur here, as well.

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Do you have questions about buying or selling Oregon real estate? Contact our sponsor, Certified Realty using the convenient form below, or call 800-637-1950 for a free consultation.

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Posted in Willamette Valley, Willamette Valley Economy, Willamette Valley Home, Willamette Valley Homes, Willamette Valley Housing, Willamette Valley Oregon, WIllamette Valley Podcast, Willamette Valley Properties, Willamette Valley Property, Willamette Valley Real Estate | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

7 Strategies to Sell Your House Sooner!

Homeselling Strategies
There are key strategies for homeseller success. What are these strategies and as an Oregon homeseller, what is it that you might need to know? As an Oregon homebuyer, you may find it helpful to understand the following insights on homeselling for an ‘inside’ view.

Strategies that Benefit Homesellers
There are some proven strategies that benefit homesellers. Chief among these is the appropriate mindset, even before implementing a well thought out ‘plan of attack.
‘  Experienced Realtors routinely guide homesellers through a ‘minefield’ of common and avoidable missteps in their many forms.

Click here or on the ‘play’ button below to hear the audio podcast version of this presentation.

Proactive awareness is one mindset that can significantly benefit homesellers. Examples of proactive awareness include addressing potential problems before they disrupt a home sale. Some specific examples might include:

1. Making sure required permits for any prior remodeling are ‘finaled,’
2. Replacing leaky gutters,
3. Trimming shrubs that touch the house,
4. Confirming there is no obvious peeling paint, or
5. Replacing windows that have broken seals.

Oregon Real Estate Podcast Besides removing such items as a possible source of contention, proactively addressing relatively simple maintenance items helps to alleviate buyer concern. That’s because if a house has numerous obvious signs of deferred maintenance, buyers may wonder about other, less obvious repairs.

Proactive awareness can also mean that you understand homebuyers have options and that as lovely as your home is, some homebuyers may prefer to live elsewhere. This mindset provides a homeseller with fortitude and the advantage of not being crestfallen when their home doesn’t sell the first week on the market.

Homesellers also benefit from strategic thinking. Based on your needs and pricing strategy, for example, this might mean setting up alternative schedule scenarios for homebuying, moving and budgeting,  depending upon whether your home sells in 10 days or 100 days.

Oregon Real Estate Podcast

Thinking Ahead is Beneficial for Homesellers

Combining proactive awareness with strategic thinking provides the kind of forethought that allows fewer surprises throughout the already stressful process of selling a home. Then, given the reduced stress that comes with having to react to negative news, you’re (1). able to focus on those issues that matter most, (2). spend less time worrying and (3). possibly even enjoy the homeselling process.

Strategy
The word ‘strategy’  is derived from the Greek word strategia, meaning the ‘office of general, command, or generalship’ and as such is considered to be a high level plan to achieve one or more goals under conditions of uncertainty

Oregon Real Estate Podcast

Degrees of Uncertainty Exist in Gambling, Battle and Homeselling

The Certainty of Uncertainty
As we saw in the Oregon Real Estate Podcast program titled The Art of War for Homesellers,’ selling a home is frequently conducted under conditions of uncertainty. Awareness and anticipation helps homesellers to better predict and influence their real estate outcome, as situations dictate, often in ‘real time.’ 

Oregon Real Estate Podcast

Kicker Tom Dempsey Accomplished his World Record Field Goal with Half a Foot!

Goals
Goals can come in many forms. A primary goal for homesellers is often a prompt, uncomplicated transaction. Reasons cited by sellers for wanting a fast and easy sale include feeling like ‘living in a fishbowl,’ or the need to constantly be ‘picking up’ to keep the home ‘show-ready.’  Other reasons might be a time-sensitive job transfer, or a firm deadline to purchase the next home before a favorable interest rate lock expires. Whatever your goals, some homesellers benefit by prioritizing them early in the process on a sheet of paper or computer printout. This roadmap can help to track progress and maintain focus on the desired outcome.

Real Estate Oregon Missions, Strategies & Tactics
First, it’s helpful to know how missions vary from strategies and tactics.  If the overarching mission is to move in a timely manner while selling your home for the most money possible, then a variety of planned strategies to sell your property faster and for top dollar could employ numerous, effective and specific tactics.

Oregon-Estate-Real

One If By Land, Two If By Sea
Think of it this way: Tactics are specific, detailed actions that often use diverse, pre-planned strategies to accomplish your mission.  For purposes of this article, we already know the mission: Selling your home without needless delay at the highest price. This means that in order to enumerate tactics to sell your house sooner and for the most money, it’s helpful to first arrive at appropriate and achievable strategies to accomplish such a mission. Let’s begin with the immutable real estate characteristic of location.

Oregon Real Estate Podcast Strategy #1: Address Your Home’s Location
Your property’s location is a key factor to consider when you sell your home. It is also the one element which cannot be changed. To properly determine real estate value, location must be considered and accounted for with respect to what buyers are willing to pay for like homes in similar locations.

Mission:
Sell your property faster, for the highest price.
Strategy:
Maximize your property’s locational advantages.
Tactic:  It’s helpful to know that many buyers for your property may not be far away. Ensure awareness among local or even hyper-local buyers, who may either have relatives already living in the area, or existing residents who may sell and wish to remain in the neighborhood. While it’s true that buyers frequently appear from outside the area, some neighborhoods have an inordinately high ‘retention factor.’ Such homebuyers know the area and are already living there ostensibly because they like it. They may want a larger or smaller home, but don’t wish to move away from their family, friends or desirable commute. Generating a ‘bidding war’ among buyers likely to strongly desire your property can be very successful.

The good news is that even homes in areas generally considered to be sub-optimal (near loud factories or industrial parks) sell. The market for these buyers may be skewed toward a particular price bracket or the hard-of-hearing, but when the locational aspects are acknowledged and adjusted for, buyer resistance to a poor location can be overcome.

If location is a major objection, it becomes especially critical to match the home to what the market will accept. Otherwise, sluggish showing activity, low offers, low appraisals and potential sale-fails are common outcomes.

Similarly, a property on a busy street may have less demand from parents with young children. However, to a disabled person whose requirements include close access to public transportation, this same property could be ideal. Some locations are more challenging than others. When dealing with high power lines, nuclear waste contamination or crime infested areas, location is more of a major limiting factor.

Secret #1: To determine an accurate list price, review comparable properties with locations that closely match the subject property. Make certain that the location of each comparable is truly similar. When performing a market analysis on your property, your real estate professional should compile a list of comparable sales that take location into account.

Specific criteria among similar homes assist in evaluating exactly what constitutes a comparable location to the subject property. This is accomplished by determining whether these residences share the same neighborhood, school district, zoning/land use restrictions, view, commute time, park proximity, street condition and volume. Only by utilizing accurate comparable sales information can maximum accuracy be achieved to understand how locational issues affect your property.

Recent, accurate and supportable market evidence is therefore essential. Real estate is unique in that it is considered “non-fungible.”  Unlike a textbook, no two homes or properties are considered identical. This being the case, a degree of professional judgment must be exercised when establishing real estate values. Once determined, you can then proceed to maximize your advantages through the remaining “7 Strategies to Sell Your House Sooner.”

Oregon Real Estate Podcast

Strategy #2: Address Your Home’s Condition
The condition of your home greatly affects how fast it will sell. One reason for this is that many buyers lack the “vision” required to imagine what a minimally maintained home could look like in its improved state. Another reason is that bargain hunters are always eager to point out deficiencies to justify their “low-ball” offers. Don’t give the bargain hunters ammunition!

Mission: Sell your property faster, for the highest price
Strategy:  Minimize negatives of your home’s condition and enhance the positive features.
Tactic: Address all significant and obvious needed repairs. Consider paint, if needed.

You can sell sooner and avoid headaches if you take the following steps:

  1. Focus on “curb appeal” – Step out to the street and take a long look at your home. Try to view the home through a buyer’s eyes. Are bushes overgrown? Does the lawn need mowing? How’s the roof? Are the gutters drooping? Is there an old car up on blocks in the driveway? Your initial task is to enhance the appearance of the home’s exterior, including the yard.  Secret #2: Realtor studies confirm you won’t get the buyers inside your home if they don’t like it from outside.
  2. Clean & uncluttered inside – Everyone prefers a clean home. Buyers will forgive clutter before they’ll forgive dirt. A thorough housecleaning is advisable prior to putting your home on the market. Be sensitive to odors in the home and neutralize them. Get rid of the clutter by storing any non-essential items which do not enhance the appearance of your home’s interior. One helpful ‘trick’ is to remove half of the items in your closets to make them look bigger. If you lack storage space, consider renting a mini-storage unit on a short-term basis. It could be a great investment!
  3. Light and bright – Dim lighting and dark colors can dissuade buyers from considering your home. If you decide to re-paint and re-carpet the interior prior to selling, choose light colors. Off white paint and light, neutral-colored carpeting have the broadest appeal. Avoid white carpet, as dirt shows more readily.
  4. Remedy deferred maintenance – Almost every home that’s more than a few years old needs a repair or two. Fortunately, many home repairs are minor and require little time and effort. Those little jobs around the house that you’ve been meaning to get to – the leaky faucet, the loose handrail, the cracked light switch cover – all could be seen as “trivial” items by a seller. Yet to buyers, these may be viewed as signs of neglect and symptomatic of larger, unseen problems.
  5. Disclose all known property defects – Don’t try to hide your home’s defects from the buyers — It could come back to haunt you.

Oregon-01 Strategy #3: Address Your Home’s Price
You don’t determine the sale price.

Your Realtor doesn’t determine the sale price.
Your well-intentioned relatives don’t determine the sale price.
Sentimental value doesn’t determine the sale price.
Your financial needs don’t determine the sale price.
Your investment in the property doesn’t determine the sale price.
You get the point.

Mission: Sell your property faster, for the highest price.
Strategy:
Maximize your seller’s net proceeds at closing by provoking a bidding war.

Tactic: Aggressive pricing at, or barely under, the current market value.

Secret #3: The market determines the sale price. Your home is worth what buyers are willing to pay.  Listen to the market. The strategy of aggressive pricing is one method to provoke a ‘bidding war’ and make buyers compete for your property. Banks sometimes use this tactic and it sometimes means not taking the first offer that comes in. What you want are clean offers, preferably cash if possible, with minimal offer conditions and a short closing timeframe.  

oregon-real-estate-podcast-24Strategy #4: Address the Marketing of Your Property
The maximally effective marketing of your home requires a multi-pronged approach. This includes not only featuring your home in the local multiple listing system, but how it is featured, including quality photos and compelling remarks in both the ‘public’ and ‘Realtor only’ versions. In addition, even if the property is correctly entered in the MLS, if showing access is limited, expect a damper on showing activity. For example, if you require 24 hour notice to show the property, then some agents working on short notice simply won’t be able to comply and there will be a missed opportunity.

Secret #4: Put the ‘Multiplier Effect’ to work for you. This means ensuring your property is promoted in the most effective venues and to the most logical buyer groups for your property type. For residential homes, this includes professional signage, flyers, plus at least one multiple listing system along with an advanced web presence. Each marketing ‘mix’ can vary, depending on factors like property type, price range and location.

Mission: Sell your property faster, for the highest price.
Strategy: 
Maximize your home’s marketing advantage to make it more attractive to buyers.
Tactic:
The larger your ‘buyer pool,’ the faster your home will sell and for the most money. To accomplish this, have your Realtor include the use of key ‘searchable’ phrases referencing your neighborhood, district or other recognizable words denoting where you live in the remarks section of your property’s listing. If seller financing is an option for you, consider offering ‘seller terms’ to further broaden your buyer base. Also helpful are yard signs and directional signs.

Oregon-Real-Estate-Podcast

Selecting the Right Buyer Pool Could Mean Rewarding Yourself at a Pool Like This One

Strategy #5: Address the Buyer Pool of Your Property
Mission: Sell your property faster, for the highest price.
Strategy: Increase the buyer pool of qualified buyers for your property in order to potentially increase your net proceeds at closing and sell your property faster.
Tactic: Offer as many terms as possible;  The more terms a seller offers, typically the faster the sale and higher the price

“Terms” in real estate parlance refers to the form in which consideration or payment is made. Common terms include cash, conventional loan, seller financing, 1031 exchange and other trade methods, a government insured loan, non-conforming loan or private investor and assumptions. Below are explanations for a few of the most commonly used terms in real estate transactions. Secret #5: Higher sales prices and shorter marketing times are benefits of offering the greatest variety of terms.

TRUE CASH BUYERS are able to close transactions rapidly without the usual lender requirements such as loan underwriting or an appraisal. Buyers also have no loan fees. Cash buyers may expect price flexibility in their negotiations with home sellers. Cash purchasers are a minority of buyer types.

CONVENTIONAL LENDERS are the most common source of residential real estate loans. Lenders assess purchaser qualifications through income, credit history and tangible assets. They also routinely require appraisals, a pest & dry rot report and other inspections, depending on the property. Most conventional loans are 80-95% loan to value, which means the buyer has a 5-20% down payment. The majority of home sales involve conventional loans.

SELLER FINANCING involves sellers willing to act as the “bank” when selling their property. Payments can be made directly to the seller, or through an intermediary, such as a collection escrow account. Often a substantial down payment is expected with a balloon payment due on the remaining balance at a pre-determined date. Because of the seller’s willingness to assume a degree of risk while also offering serious savings (buyers have no loan fee or appraisal to pay), seller financing tends to deliver higher sales prices. Interest rates vary depending upon the motivation of the parties involved and other negotiated factors. Typically, seller financing is secured with a trust deed or land sales contract. Unless the property being purchased has either no loan remaining or little owed on it, a current lender’s “due on sale” clause may prevent seller financing as an option.

NON-CONFORMING LENDERS are a financing option for those unable to secure financing under conventional guidelines. Many are willing to waive a purchaser’s debt rations if net assets are considerable. Home equity loans are a popular market for these lenders. Interest rates tend to be higher than conventional loans, plus various up-front fees and points are often required.

PRIVATE INVESTORS assist in financing real estate transactions to receive greater returns on their investment. For instance, most lenders will not loan on homes lacking a foundation. Private investors are often eager to fill this gap and loan the money to the purchaser, thereby “cashing out” the seller. Payments from the purchaser are then made to the investor. To ensure an attractive return, significant penalties for prepayment are common.

GOVERNMENT INSURED LOANS (FHA/VA) are government-backed loans requiring additional paperwork and documentation. These programs frequently offer significantly lower loan limits, longer processing times and more stringent home condition requirements than conventional loans but by agreeing to sell your home under these conditions can be helpful in enlarging your pool of potential buyers.

ASSUMPTIONS involve a buyer taking over the seller’s prior obligation by making a payment or securing financing for the difference between the selling price and the assumed amount. “Qualified” assumptions typically require that a buyer who assumes an existing loan first be qualified by the existing lender. “Blind” assumptions require few qualifications, sometimes necessitating only that the purchaser pay a set fee.

You’ve Heard the First Five Strategies. For the entire power packed list, just complete the convenient form below to receive the full report, “7 Strategies to Sell Your House Sooner!”

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